planning strategy

Planning Strategy

The Planning Strategy team undertakes research and monitoring of development activities to assist in the preparation of spatial planning policies, proposals and guidance which will shape the way in which Stroud District is developed in the future.

The service is also responsible for providing advice and guidance on a range of environmental issues such as sustainable development; climate change, energy conservation, biodiversity and building conservation.

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Stroud District Local Plan 2005 and Mapping

The Stroud District Local Plan was produced in line with the relevant statutory processes leading to Adoption on 10 November 2005. It remains the key planning policy document for making development control decisions until its policies are replaced through the adoption of a new Stroud District Local Plan, which is currently under preparation.

Inspectors Report

The Inspector's report into the Local Plan Inquiry that ran from 15 January 2002 until 3 June 2003 was received on 25 November 2004.

Adopted Local Plan

Stroud District Local Plan - indicates where different buildings, from homes to shops, offices, schools, leisure and health facilities may be built. It forms part of the development plan for the area of Stroud District Council and runs until 2011. The development plan forms the basis for decisions on land use planning affecting this area. It was produced in line with the relevant statutory processes leading to Adoption on 10 November 2005.

Saved and Deleted Local Plan Policies

The Policies of the Local Plan expired on 10 November 2008 unless they were saved by a Direction made by the Secretary of State under the provisions of the Planning and Compulsory Purchase Act 2004.

A report on the matter was initially considered by the Cabinet of the Council on 10 July 2008.

In turn this was considered by Council on 18 September 2008, including representations received by the Council from Parish and Town Councils on the issue.

Following these meetings the Council applied to the Secretary of State for a Direction and forwarded the Parish and Town Council comments to be considered when making the Direction.

The Secretary of State made a Direction. With the exception of Policy GE4 relating to flooding issues, the Secretary of State agreed with the Council on the policies it proposed to ‘save' and the policies it considered could be deleted. She considered Policy GE4 was covered by provisions in PPS25 and therefore that policy could be deleted. The Direction made by the Secretary of State and a table of Saved / deleted Policies is shown below:

Local Plan Maps

You can download the maps from the Adopted Local Plan here.


Consultation

Stroud District Local Plan: Pre Submission Consultation

"Consultation is an essential part of the preparation of planning documents, particularly the Local Plan. The NPPF states that “early and meaningful engagement and collaboration with neighbourhoods, local organisations and business is essential. A wide selection of the community should be proactively engaged, so that Local Plans, as far as possible, reflect a collective vision and a set of agreed priorities for the sustainable development of the area, including those contained in any neighbouring land that have been made.” (DCLG, 2012).

Consultation Hub

The Council has a dedicated consultation website called the Consultation Hub where consultations are held on a variety of issues affecting all residents and businesses in the Stroud District area.

Statement of Community Involvement (SCI)

Statement of Community Involvement (SCI) Stroud District Council has prepared a Statement of Community Involvement (SCI) as part of its Local Development Framework (LDF) for the district. The document proposes the Council's strategy for community involvement in the planning process. It sets out the ways in which we will engage and involve people when we are formulating planning policies for the Local Plan and considering planning applications. The SCI was adopted by the Council on 8th November 2007.

The Statement of Community Involvement was amended to allow for electronic communication in the first instance and a report was placed before Council's Cabinet in March 2009 and was then referred to Council in April 2009. The full report can be viewed via the link on the Council's Democracy area of the Web site.

It should be noted that the SCI has been superseded by changes in the Council's Constitution and legislation and until the SCI is updated these documents must be read in conjunction. For the avoidance of doubt, where there is a conflict between these documents, legislation, and then the Constitution shall take precedence.


Consultations on the emerging Stroud District Local Plan

The Council consulted on a Key Issues Discussion Paper in Spring 2009, an Alternative Strategies document in February 2010, a Preferred Strategy document in February 2012 and a Policies document in March 2013, as well as on a number of discussion papers.

The Council has engaged with a wide range of organisations and individuals about the Local Plan and with neighbouring local planning authorities. The Council has considered community views expressed through parish plans and other documents. The Council has taken into account of all of the views expressed during these consultations in preparing the Local Plan.

Details on past public consultations, including documents, questionnaires and reports on the results of consultation can be found here.

Supplementary Guidance

 

The District Council has initiated three types of supplementary guidance to aid the public in understanding the issues facing the District and assist decision taking on planning applications. According to the processes that they have been through in preparation, different weight is accorded to them in decision taking.

Supplementary Planning Guidance (SPG)

This form of guidance was prepared under the pre 2004 planning system. It is existing non-statutory guidance which supplements the Stroud District Local Plan (SDLP) 2005 element of the Development Plan. Only the Policies in the Development Plan have the special status afforded by Section 38(6) of the Planning and Compulsory Purchase Act 2004 in deciding planning applications. However, SPG’s may be taken into account as material considerations in determining planning applications. The weight of the SPG in decision taking increases if it has been prepared in consultation with the public and has been the subject of a Council Resolution.

The following documents have been adopted by the Council as SPGs

Supplementary Planning Advice (SPA)

These documents support the planning policies adopted by the Council but have not been subject to the same level of process as either SPGs or SPDs. However, they can be referred to for guidance and may be used in decision making. The weight given to them may be more limited than other documents.

IHCA Design Guide

The Industrial Heritage Conservation Area Design Guide was adopted by Council as Supplementary Planning Advice (SPA) on 6th Nov 2008 and forms part of the IHCA Conservation Area Statement. It acts as a practical supplement to the policy and design guidance contained in the IHCA Management Proposals SPD and focuses on ways to preserve or enhance the local distinctiveness and special character of the eight conservation areas covered by the IHCA review through the design of new development – from small home extensions to major development schemes. You can download the Design Guide chapter by chapter:

Please also see the The Industrial Heritage Conservation Area Management Proposals.

Stroud Public Realm Strategy

Stonehouse Design Statement

Approved by the Cabinet on 6 October 2005, The Stonehouse Design Statement, has been produced by a steering group comprised of non-elected residents and Stonehouse town councillors, working in close partnership with officers of the Council.

Nailsworth Design Statement

The Nailsworth Design Statement was adopted by the Council on 16.4.09 and should be regarded as a material consideration in making any development control recommendations or decisions.

Bisley-with-Lypiatt Statement

The Bisley with Lypiatt Parish Village Design Statement was adopted by the Council on 11 th November 2010 (with the exception of the Local Views Sections) and will be a material consideration in Development Control decision making.

Nailsworth Design Statement

Frampton Conservation Area Statement

Longney and Epney Parish Design Statement

The Longney and Epney Parish Design Statement was adopted on 22 September 2011 and will be a material consideration in Development Control decision making. The following external link will take you to the document.

Householders Design Guide

Validation of Planning Applications

Whitminster Design Statement

This Design Statement was adopted on 23rd October 2014 at Environment Committee and will be a material consideration in Development Management decision making. The following external link will take you to the document

Woodchester Parish Design Statement (2012)

The Woodchester Parish Design Statement was adopted on 26 April 2012 and will be a material consideration in decision making.

Alkington Design Statement (2014)

The Alkington design statement was adopted on 19 June 2014 and will be a material consideration in decision making.

Supplementary Planning Document (SPD)

This form of guidance is prepared under the post 2004 planning system. It must supplement a part of the Development Plan. Currently the SDLP 2005 plays that role but will increasingly be replaced the emerging Stroud District Local Plan 2014. SPDs (like SPGs) are used to provide further detail to policies and proposals contained in a Development Plan Document. SPDs are an important consideration in determining planning applications.

SPDs may cover a range of issues and can be thematic or site specific. For example, an SPD may be a design guide, development brief or a topic or issue based document.

The following documents have been adopted by the Council as SPDs

The Industrial Heritage Conservation Area Management Proposals

This document was adopted by Council as a Supplementary Planning Document (SPD) on 6th Nov 2008. It forms part of the IHCA Conservation Area Statement.

Industrial Heritage Conservation Area Management Proposals

Together with a Summary of Representations report (Reg.18 statement), which sets out key findings of the public consultation:

And the Regulation 19 Adoption Statement:

Neighbourhood Planning

Background

The Localism Act 2011 provides for town and parish councils to be designated as a Neighbourhood. Neighbourhoods have the ability to create Neighbourhood Development Plans; adding a local flavour to the Development Plan (Local Plan and the National Planning Policy Framework). It may also make Neighbourhood Development Orders which effectively extend permitted development rights within the Parish and allows the building of community led facilities outside of the normal planning framework. For further advice please see the Locality website.

Chalford

Chalford Parish Council has registered it’s interest in becoming a "neighbourhood" under the Localism Act 2011. You can read their letter of application - (PDF) and view the map - (PDF).

Before determining the application, Stroud District Council is required to publicise the request on its website and in the local press. To ensure that those interested in planning matters are made aware, the request will be advertised together with the weekly list of planning applications on the Wednesday 26th March 2014. Any comments must received by 7th May 2014; and can be sent to the Planning Service, Ebley Mill, Stroud GL5 4UB or via email to planning@stroud.gov.uk (you must include your name and postal address). Any comments will be a matter of public record and reported to the Environment Committee. As such the names and addresses of those commenting are likely to be included in the committee report and appear on our website.

Cam

On 4th February 2014 the Parish of Cam was conferred with the status of Neighbourhood under the Localism Act 2011 and Part 2 of The Neighbourhood Planning (General) Regulations 2012. The following documents are available:

Dursley

On 4th February 2014 the Parish of Dursley was conferred with the status of Neighbourhood under the Localism Act 2011 and Part 2 of The Neighbourhood Planning (General) Regulations 2012. The following documents are available:

Eastington

On the 12 September 2013 the parish of Eastington was conferred with the status of Neighbourhood under the Localism Act 2011 and Part 2 of The Neighbourhood Planning (General) Regulations 2012. The following documents are available:

Hardwicke

On 4th February 2014 the Parish of Hardwicke was conferred with the status of Neighbourhood under the Localism Act 2011 and Part 2 of The Neighbourhood Planning (General) Regulations 2012. The following documents are available:

Kingswood Parish Council

Kingswood Parish Council has registered it’s interest in becoming a "neighbourhood" under the Localism Act 2011. You can read their letter of application - (PDF) and view the map - (PDF). Before determining the application, Stroud District Council is required to publicise the request on its website and in the local press. To ensure that those interested in planning matters are made aware, the request will be advertised together with the weekly list of planning applications on Wednesday 5th March 2014. Any comments must received by Wednesday 16th April 2014; and can be sent to the Planning Service, Ebley Mill, Stroud GL5 4UB or via email to planning@stroud.gov.uk (you must include your name and postal address). Any comments will be a matter of public record and reported to the Environment Committee. As such the names and addresses of those commenting are likely to be included in the committee report and appear on our website.

Stonehouse Town Council

On the 12 September 2013 the parish of Stonehouse was conferred with the status of Neighbourhood under the Localism Act 2011 and Part 2 of The Neighbourhood Planning (General) Regulations 2012. The following documents are available:

Standish Parish Council

On 4th February 2014 the Parish of Hardwicke was conferred with the status of Neighbourhood under the Localism Act 2011 and Part 2 of The Neighbourhood Planning (General) Regulations 2012. The following documents are available:

Stroud Town Council

Stroud Town Council has registered it’s interest in becoming a "neighbourhood" under the Localism Act 2011. You can read their letter of application - (PDF) and view the map - (PDF). Before determining the application, Stroud District Council is required to publicise the request on its website and in the local press. To ensure that those interested in planning matters are made aware, the request will be advertised together with the weekly list of planning applications on the Wednesday 4th June 2014. Any comments must be received by 16th July 2014 and can be sent to the Planning Service, Ebley Mill, Ebley Wharf, Stroud GL5 4UB or via email to planning@stroud.gov.uk (you must include your name and postal address). Any comments will be a matter of public record and reported to the Environment Committee. As such the names and addresses of those commenting are likely to be included in the committee report and appear on our website.

Whiteshill and Ruscombe

On the 12 September 2013 the parish of Whiteshill and Ruscombe was conferred with the status of Neighbourhood under the Localism Act 2011 and Part 2 of The Neighbourhood Planning (General) Regulations 2012. The following documents are available:

  • Letter of application - PDF
  • Map showing the extent of the neighbourhood - PDF
  • Designation as a Neighbourhood and Whiteshill and Ruscombe Parish Council as the relevant body - PDF

Other Policy Documents

Waste and Minerals

Gloucestershire County Council is the local planning authority for waste and minerals planning matters within Stroud District.

The following documents are, or will, form part of the development plan for Stroud District:

Please contact Gloucestershire Council for further information regarding these documents.

Local Transport Plan

Gloucestershire County Council is the local highway authority for Stroud District.

Plans produced by Neighbouring Authorities

Information regarding development plans produced by neighbouring authorities can be found here:

Cheltenham Borough, Gloucester City and Tewkesbury Borough Councils are producing a Joint Core Strategy. More information can be found here

Stroud District Local Plan 2014

Why do we need a new Local Plan?

The current Stroud District Local Plan was adopted in 2005. Although many of the policies in this plan remain relevant today, the plan only sought to identify development needs for the period to 2011. National policy, contained within the National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF), requires local plans to be kept up to date. There is now a requirement to plan for current and future development needs over at least a 15 year time horizon.

Local plans can be reviewed in whole or in part. In the past, the District Council considered producing a Core Strategy backed up by a suite of other development plan documents. However, following recent changes to the planning system, the intention now is to replace in one document the current adopted Local Plan. The District Council does not, currently, envisage producing any further development plan documents, but this will be kept under review.

Guidance on the planning system is available on the Government's Planning Portal Website. Please view the sections below regarding progress with the new emerging Stroud District Local Plan 2014.

Local Plan Timetable

September - October 2013 Statutory 6 week Regulation 19 public consultation on ‘Pre-Submission Local Plan' and associated documents (final SEA/SA, IDP, Statement of Public Consultation)

November - December 2013

Preparation of final submission documents

December 2013

Submission of Local Plan to Secretary of State

Spring/Summer 2014

Examination in public

Autumn 2014

Inspectors Report

Winter 2014/2015 Adoption of Local Plan

For current progress on the emerging Stroud District Local Plan 2014, please contact us on 01453 754143 or email local.plan@stroud.gov.uk

The Emerging Stroud District Local Plan 2014

Publication of the proposed submission Stroud District Local Plan (pre-submission)

Stroud District Council published the Stroud District Local Plan: Pre-Submission Draft for a six week period for representations from Wednesday 4th September 2013 until Wednesday 16 th October 2013.

Copies of the Pre-Submission Stroud District Local Plan and supporting documents are available to view here: www.stroud.gov.uk/consult

755 representations were received from 155 representors. The representations will be available to view shortly here: www.stroud.gov.uk/consult

Submission of the Stroud District Local Plan

Stroud District Council submitted the draft Stroud District Local Plan to the Planning Inspectorate for examination on Wednesday 18 December 2013.

The submitted plan and selected supporting documents can be viewed here:

The submission documents will be made available to view in January at the Council offices, town and parish council offices available to the public and at local libraries.

Examination of the Stroud District Local Plan

An Inspector has been appointed to examine the Plan. A Programme Officer has also been appointed who will organise the examination process. Further information can be found here.

Progress to Date

A brief history of the process so far is given below

If you wish to contact the Planning Strategy team about the preparation of the Local Plan, please use one of these modes of communication.

Phone: 01453 754143

Email : local.plan@stroud.gov.uk

Write:
Planning Strategy Team Stroud District Council
Ebley Mill
Ebley Wharf
Stroud
GL5 4UB

Evidence Base (LDF)

The Council has developed an evidence base to support the preparation of the Local Plan. A number of studies have been produced or are under preparation, in some cases undertaken with or by other authorities and consultants. Where available these may be viewed via the links given on this page. Due to the large amount of external links on this page please email us if you notice a link has been moved.

Housing Evidence

Gloucestershire Strategic Housing Market Assessment

The National Planning Policy Framework requires local planning authorities to “have a clear understanding of housing needs in their area. They should: prepare a Strategic Housing Market Assessment to assess their full housing needs, working with neighbouring authorities where housing market areas cross administrative boundaries.” (DCLG, 2012)

In 2007 the six Gloucestershire District and Borough Councils and Gloucestershire County Council jointly commissioned consultants to complete a Strategic Housing Market Assessment (SHMA) for the Gloucestershire Housing Market Area of the South West Region.

Following stakeholder consultation the suite of SHMA documents was finalised on 16th February 2009. However, an additional chapter (see chapter 16) was added in April 2010 to summarise the results and the policy implications of the 2009 Housing Needs Assessment (HNA) - (PDF).

The Gloucestershire Strategic Housing Market Assessment Partnership also produced a Management Summary which outlines the SHMA process and helps explains the relationship of the component documents. It is advisable to read this first.

In 2013 the Gloucestershire authorities appointed consultants to update both the previous Strategic Housing Market Assessment in Gloucestershire (published in 2009) and the Housing Needs Assessment across the County undertaken in 2009 (finalised in 2010). The Update was required to inform the prospective development plans being produced in several authorities within the County and to ensure compliance with the NPPF. In addition the Update was required to assess the local impact and the appropriate response within the current market conditions and new policy landscape of changes made by the Coalition Government to the housing sector, including the introduction of Affordable Rent - the scope of which needs to be established. The Update adhered to the approach set out in the Strategic Housing Market Assessment – Practice Guidance.

Gloucestershire Housing Evidence Review

The Gloucestershire Housing Evidence Review was a research exercise which investigated the housing market in Gloucestershire and its relationship to the nature of the local population, the local economy and the presence of 'housing need'. The Review examined key relationships and patterns of change in the recent past, and allowed for forecasts of the future.

The Gloucestershire Housing Evidence Review was commissioned by all of the county's Local Authorities in partnership, with project management being provided by the County Council.

Downloadable documents in PDF form are provided. These cover the overall project in more detail and the output reports for components one and two (May 2011) and component three (Oct 2011).

Gypsies, Travellers and Travelling Showpeople

The government's Planning Policy for Traveller Sites requires local authorities to identify and update annually a supply of specific, deliverable residential sites for Gypsies, Travellers and Travelling Showpeople (GTTS). The 2013 Gloucestershire Gypsy, Traveller and Travelling Showpeople Accommodation Assessment identifies the county-wide and local authority requirements for GTTS sites between 2013 and 2031. The next stage will be to identify a sufficient number of sites to meet this future need and provide some flexibility over site selection.

*Please note that this is a final draft of the GTTSAA which has yet to be signed off by all parties. It is anticipated that a final approved version will be available by early October 2013

As part of this process, a county-wide ‘call for sites’ is being undertaken, through which individuals and organisations are invited to submit for consideration sites that they feel could be suitable for this purpose within Gloucestershire.

 

We have recently completed a ‘call for sites’ which ran for six weeks between Monday 12th August and Friday 4th October 2013. in forthcoming months Stroud District Council will consider the submissions.

For any further information call 01453 754134 and ask for Conrad Moore or Laura Stephen in Planning Strategy Team.

The final GTTSAA is below and has been formally signed off by all the local authorities in Gloucestershire.

Population Growth & Total Housing Requirements Review August 2012

Early work on our Local Plan (formerly Core Strategy) was developed to align with the housing requirements of the Regional Spatial Strategy for the South West (SWRSS). However, in the light of the demise of the SWRSS, at Council on 22 September 2011 Members agreed to consult on a new housing target of 9,350 homes based upon DCLG Nov 2010 Household Projections. This figure formed part of the Preferred Strategy consultation during February/March 2012. It created considerable debate and challenge with arguments being put forward for both higher and lower figures.

In response, we commissioned an independent consultant to review the population growth and housing requirements for the district based on the latest information available. The consultant engaged, (Dr Keith Woodhead, former Regional Policy Manager and Head of Planning for SW Regional Assembly specialising in demographics; now an independent consultant specialising in strategic planning policy and demographic and economic research), has researched the latest evidence available and addressed the arguments made in these responses concerning the housing requirement. Copies of his reports containing appropriate policy advice to the Council can be viewed below.

Settlement Hierarchy

The District Council approved the Stroud District Local Plan: Pre-Submission Draft in July 2013. This topic paper update (from that provided in 2010) helps inform how a hierarchy for growth and development was produced over time to draft Core Policy 3 – Settlement Hierarchy in the Pre-Submission Local Plan. One of the primary aims of establishing a settlement hierarchy is to promote sustainable communities by bringing housing, jobs and services closer together in an attempt to maintain and promote the viability of local facilities and reduce the need to travel to services and facilities elsewhere.

Strategic Housing Land Availability Assessment (SHLAA)

The SHLAA provides information on opportunities that exist to meet the housing needs within the District. The NPPF requires local planning authorities to “prepare a Strategic Housing Land Availability Assessment to establish realistic assumptions about the availability, suitability and the likely economic viability of land to meet the identified need for housing over the plan period.” (DCLG, 2012)

It has informed the preparation of the emerging Local Plan for Stroud District.

The aims of the SHLAA are:

  • To identify sites with potential for housing
  • To assess their housing potential, and
  • To assess when they are likely to be developed

Although the SHLAA is an important evidence source to inform plan-making it does not, in itself, determine whether a site should be allocated for housing development. The first SHLAA Report was published in March 2010 and an update was produced in 2011. A further update is currently under preparation..

Progress

Stage Date Supporting Documents

SHLAA update report 2011

December 2011

Final SHLAA report

January 2010

Two stakeholder workshops held for:

District Councillors

Developers, agents, landowners etc

 

2 July 2009

3 July 2009

Site Assessment Panel

August 2009

Roger Tym and Partners appointed to complete SHLAA

June 2009  
Two “calls” for sites

March 2008

January 2009

 

Desk top survey of potential sites

February 2008

Methodology published

February 2008

Methodology scoping report published

September 2007

Economic Evidence

Stroud Town Centres and Retailing Study

This report was prepared by GVA Grimley Ltd in response to an instruction by Stroud District Council, dated September 2009, to prepare a Town Centres & Retailing Study for the Stroud administrative area. This study provides essential background information to assist the Council in the production of the emerging District Local Plan.

This study was informed by a number of pieces of empirical research (including household and on-street surveys), plus a detailed analysis of town centre health and current retail expenditure patterns. Arising out of these assessments, the retail context in Stroud District was identified together with a set of key issues in each of the main settlements in the District.


You can view the study and appendices via the links below.

In 2013, GVA was instructed by the District Council to prepare an update to its Town Centres & Retailing Study. This update study supersedes parts of the July 2010 study. This update study concentrated upon three areas:

  • A review of the changes in national retail and town centre policy since the completion of the 2010 study;
  • An updated assessment of quantitative need for retail floorspace across the main settlements in Stroud District; and
  • A review of the retail and town centre policies within the March/May 2013 policies consultation version of the Stroud District Local Plan.

As a consequence, parts of Sections 5, 6 and 7 of the 2010 study are superseded by this study and the latter parts of this document explain which parts of the 2010 study are no longer relevant.

You can view the update via the link below

Employment Studies

An employment land study was undertaken by AECOM in partnership with BE Group for the Council in 2012/13. A copy of the draft report is available to view below.

Two previous studies were undertaken to provide baseline information to inform the development of Council policy; particularly spatial planning policy for employment purposes, and formulating economic development, marketing and promotion strategies and in the preparation of bids for funding.”

The first was undertaken by White Young Green Planning and Chesterton Plc in Autumn 2003 to assist in developing policy related to the Stroud Valleys and in particular the restoration of the Cotswold Canals.

A second study covering the whole district was undertaken during 2007 by GVA Grimley to provide evidence to inform the preparation of the Council's Core Strategy and other documents in the Local Development Framework (LDF).

You can view the studies via the links below.

Useful Links

Community Infrastructure Levy (CIL) Development Appraisal Study

Stroud District Council (SDC) appointed Christopher Marsh & Co Ltd in 2011 to prepare a Development Appraisal Study to underpin their approach to Community Infrastructure Levy, taking account of Affordable Housing Viability and all other financial variables. CIL was proposed by the previous Government (and has been endorsed by the present Government) as a fairer system for securing financial contributions from landowners and developers to the provision of community infrastructure by public bodies. It replaces what was seen as the inconsistent arrangements that local authorities had introduced to secure developer contributions using individual agreements and policies under s106 of the Town and Country Planning Act. The purpose of this Study is to assess the viability of housing and commercial development in the District. It considers options for affordable housing policy so that the implications of these for CIL can be considered.

Local Plan Viability

Local plans should be deliverable and the scale of planning obligations and policy requirements contained within local plans should not threaten the viability of development. In 2013, the Council commissioned consultants to provide an assessment of the impact on viability of the policies in the emerging Stroud District Local Plan, and to ensure that the combined impact of the policies does not render development un-viable to the extent that the delivery of the Plan is prejudiced. This study examined the viability of the strategic site allocations and a suite of typical development sites that are likely to come forward over the plan period.

Environmental Evidence

Strategic Flood Risk Assessment (SFRA)

Strategic Flood Risk Assessment - Level 1

Stroud District Council with the other five district's and the County in Gloucestershire have worked together to produce a Level 1 Strategic Flood Risk Assessment (SFRA). The SFRA identifies levels of flood risk from all sources of flooding within the District. The assessment will be used to inform the emerging Local Plan and as a material consideration in the determination of planning applications.

This work allows the flood risk vulnerability and flood zone compatibility to be examined using the Sequential Test set out in the NPPF and technical guidance. A Level 2 SFRA has been carried out in order to provide a detailed assessment of the risk of flooding from non-fluvial sources in areas where new development is proposed. It will also be required where the need to apply the exception test is identified. A level 2 SFRA involves a more detailed review of flood hazard (flood probability, flood depth, flood velocity, rate of onset of flooding) taking into account the presence of flood risk management measures such as flood defences. They can also inform the level of detail required for site-specific Flood Risk Assessments (FRA's) by developers.

Countywide information on the SFRA can be found at: www.gloucestershire.gov.uk/SFRA

Strategic Flood Risk Assessment - Level 2

In December 2010, Stroud District Council commissioned Halcrow Group Limited to produce a Level 2 Strategic Flood Risk Assessment (SFRA). The study comprises two-dimensional (2D) hydraulic modelling of watercourses at four locations within the District including: Quedgeley, Dursley, Stroud and Sharpness, to produce refined Flood Zone information for Flood Zones 2 (1 in 1000 year), 3a (1 in 100 year), 3a plus climate change (1 in 100 year +20%) and 3b (1 in 20 year).

The study refines and builds upon the work undertaken during the Level 1 SFRA. It serves to address the issues of coarse flood plain mapping recognised in the Level 1 study and further completes the assessment by the provision of Flood Zones where they did previously not exist, in order to better inform the Sequential Test and site selection process, which the Council has undertaken as part of the development of the Local Plan.

It also assesses the flood hazard posed by these watercourses as well as the residual risk from partial blockage of selected culverts and, from breach or overtopping of flood defences and canals. In addition, the study includes an assessment of some 125 potential development sites, some of which may be taken forward for development in the future.

The principal purpose of a Level 2 SFRA is to facilitate the application of the Sequential and Exception Tests required by the NPPF and the accompanying technical guide.

The Environment Agency has been consulted throughout the study to ensure that the approach is robust and meets best practice. The EA sign off letter can be viewed below.

Appendix File Title
  Sign-off Letter - PDF
  Strategic Flood Risk Assessment - Level 2 - PDF
A Site Assessments Site Plans - PDF (Please note this document is 30MB so may take some time to load)
B Sequential Test Process - PDF
C

Hydrological Analysis and Hydraulic Modelling Technical Notes - Dursley - PDF

Hydrological Analysis and Hydraulic Modelling Technical Notes - Quedgeley - PDF

Hydrological Analysis and Hydraulic Modelling Technical Notes - Sharpness - PDF

Hydrological Analysis and Hydraulic Modelling Technical Notes - Stroud - PDF

D Summary of Modelled Extents - PDF

SFRA2 Addendum Report 2014

The Environment Agency made representations to the Pre-Submission Draft Local Plan regarding flood risk and floodplain modifications. In response the Council commissioned an early review of the SFRA2 outputs in respect of these specific sites:

  • SA4 – Hunts Grove Extension
  • SA4a – Land at Quedgeley East
  • SA5a – Land south of Severn Distribution Park

Addendums

Flood Risk Sequential Test

This document considers the extent to which development sites within Stroud District are at risk of flooding and helps to inform the process of allocating suitable sites through the Development Plan preparation process. It is important that this document is read in conjunction with the Council’s Submission version of the Local Plan (December 2013) as this provides the context for the future development strategy that the District Council is proposing. This document should also be read with the Strategic Flood Risk Assessment (Level 2) findings.

National Planning Guidance

For an overview of National Policy please refer to the relevant pages of https://www.gov.uk/government/topics/planning-and-building

Infrastructure Evidence

The purpose of the Infrastructure Delivery Plan (IDP) is to evaluate the transport, utilities, community and green infrastructure and services that will be required to support the levels of housing and employment growth proposed in the emerging Local Plan 2011-2031. This Interim Version of the IDP was prepared between March 2013 and June 2013 and further ‘refresh’ versions of the IDP will be prepared, taking account of consultation comments on the Pre-Submission Draft Local Plan and updates provided by the organisations responsible for the provision of infrastructure.

Outdoor Playspace Provision Survey 2013

Open spaces can perform many roles; they can, for example, provide opportunities for active exercise and recreation, or serve as areas for quiet relaxation. Open spaces can also have an amenity and environmental value by providing physical and visual breaks, especially in predominantly urbanised areas. The natural environment can also benefit from open space provision since open spaces often serve as ‘green lungs’ and contribute to local biodiversity. The aesthetic qualities of open spaces are evident even when the open space in question is privately owned and not necessarily available to the general public. Hence, open spaces can help enhance the character of a particular locality and contribute to the quality of life of local residents. These benefits relate to some of the important principles of sustainable development. This draft 2013 Outdoor Playspace Provision Study seeks to update earlier research and advice.

Strategic Allocations

North East Cam

Hunts Grove Extension

The promoters of this site have submitted the following documents in support of this strategic allocation:

Sharpness Docks

The promoters of this site have submitted the following documents in support of this strategic allocation:

Sustainability Appraisals

Section 39 of the Planning and Compulsory Purchase Act requires local development documents to be prepared with a view to contributing to the achievement of sustainable development. At the heart of sustainable development is the simple idea of ensuring a better quality of life for everyone, now and for future generations. A widely used definition was drawn up by the World Commission on Environment and Development in 1987: "development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs" .

Local planning authorities must comply with European Union Directive 2001/42/EC which requires formal strategic environmental assessment of certain plans and programmes which are likely to have significant effects on the environment.

Sustainability appraisal is a systematic and iterative appraisal process. The main purpose of sustainability appraisal is to appraise the social, environmental and economic effects of plan strategies and policies, from the outset of the preparation process, so that decisions can be made that accord with the objectives of sustainable development. Local planning authorities, in preparing local development documents must fulfil the minimum requirements of sustainability appraisal. It should be started as soon as a new or revised local development document is first considered, and should provide input at each stage when decisions are taken.

Sustainability appraisal should also be used in developing the arrangements for monitoring the implementation of the plan, which should lead to the identification of issues to inform the need for action or the revision/replacement of a local development document.

There are a number of key stages to the sustainability appraisal process set out below.

Development Plan Document Pre- Production Stage

  • A. Setting the context and objectives, establishing the baseline and deciding on the scope
  • A1. Identify other relevant plans, programmes and sustainability objectives
  • A2. Collect baseline information
  • A3. Identify sustainability issues
  • A4. Develop the SA framework
  • A5. Test the plan objectives against the SA framework
  • A6. Consult on the scope of the SA

Development Plan Document Production Stages

  • B. Developing and refining options
    B1. Appraise issues and options
    B2. Consult on the SA of emerging options
  • C. Appraising the effects of the plan
    C1. Predict the effects of the plan, including plan options
    C2. Assess the effects of the plan
    C3. Mitigate adverse effects and maximise beneficial effects
    C4. Develop proposals for monitoring
    C5. Prepare the SA report
  • D. Consulting on the plan and SA report
    D1. Consult on the SA report alongside the plan
    D2. Appraise significant changes
    D3. Decision making and provision of information

Adoption and Monitoring

E. Monitor implementation of the plan
E1. Monitor the significant effects of the plan
E2. Respond to any adverse effects

The following reports have been prepared as part of the development of planning policy in Stroud District since 2007. Later documents have been prepared as part of the development of the emerging Stroud District Local Plan.

The scoping report and scoping report feedback and responses following a consultation period in early 2007 are available here.

Since 2007, there have been significant planning changes. To take account of these changes, the Council determined it was necessary to do a review of the 2007 scoping report and its associated objectives to ensure that they are as current as possible. The review was carried out in Spring 2009. This included a consultation period in early 2009 with statutory consultees. The reports are available here.

Appendices

Alternative Strategies 2009


» Core Strategy Sustainability Appraisals
(PDF)

Alternative Strategies (Options) 2012


» Sustainability Appraisal Report (January 2012)
(PDF)

Local Plan Policies 2013


» Stroud Interim SA Policies Report (April 2013) (PDF)

Committee version of Draft Local Plan 2013

» Stroud Local_Plan_Draft_SA_Report_July_2013 - PDF

Following the Council meeting in July the recommendations have been incorporated into a final Sustainability Appraisal to accompany the local plan.

Habitat Regulations Assessment

The Habitats Regulations require competent authorities to carry out appropriate assessments in certain circumstances where a plan or project affects a Natura 2000 (European) site. It is required under the European Directive 92/43/EEC on the 'conservation of natural habitats and wild fauna and flora'. Natura 2000 sites are nature conservation sites of European importance and are designated either Special Protection Areas (for birds) or Special Areas of Conservation (for animals and habitats). In addition, Ramsar sites (Internationally Important Wetlands) are treated as if they were Natura 2000 sites in accordance with Government policy.

Habitats Regulations Appraisal (HRA) refers to the whole process, including the Appropriate Assessment (AA) step. Although 'Appropriate Assessment' is often used to refer to the whole process, it is actually one step in the process.

Appropriate assessment is required when a plan or project affects a Natura site and:

  • Is not connected with management of the site for nature conservation, and
  • Is likely to have a significant effect on the site (either alone or in combination with other plans or projects)

This applies to any plan or project which has the potential to affect a Natura site, no matter how far away from that site. An appropriate assessment should focus exclusively on the qualifying interests of the Natura site affected and must consider any impacts on the conservation objectives of the site.

The HRA has been carried out in the continuing absence of formal Government guidance.  DCLG released a consultation paper on AA of Plans in 2006. As yet, no further formal guidance has emerged.

Initially Stroud District Council followed the RSPB Published Guidance at a preliminary stage when Core Strategy options were being considered in 2010. Stroud District Council produced a ‘Core Strategy Topic Paper: Preliminary Habitat Regulations Screening Work' document in February 2010. That document was a high level initial exercise utilising RSPB guidance and advice from Natural England and was not intended to present a complete Habitat Regulations Assessment.

Following discussion with Natural England, this report sets out the Habitat Regulations Assessment Screening (Likely Significant Effects) exercise for the draft Stroud District Local Plan. Contained within the URS report are potential measures that could enable any effects to be screened out.

URS has since been commissioned to undertake an HRA of the Stroud Pre-Submission Local Plan. The following report assesses the Committee version of the draft Stroud District Local Plan in July 2013.

Following the Council meeting in July the recommendations have been incorporated into a final Habitat Regulations Assessment to accompany the local plan.

Monitoring

The implementation of planning policies should be monitored on a continuous basis, to assess how they are working in terms of delivering the strategy and objectives that are set out in the relevant policy document. Continuous monitoring enables an assessment of the effectiveness of planning policies. It helps to address questions like:

  • Are policies achieving their objectives and in particular are they delivering sustainable development?
  • Have policies had unintended consequences that were not originally anticipated?
  • Are the assumptions and objectives underpinning the policies still relevant and applicable?
  • Are the targets being achieved?

The emerging Stroud District Local Plan will include a monitoring framework to assess the performance of the Local Plan over its course up to 2031. It will provide the key mechanism for ensuring that Council's vision and the spatial objectives and policies stemming from it are successfully delivered. The monitoring framework will set out a series of key indicators, which can be used to measure the Local Plan's performance. They will have related targets in order to assess whether current policies are working effectively or whether they need to be reviewed or replaced. Where it becomes evident that perhaps policies are not performing as initially envisaged or intended, any subsequent monitoring analysis will suggest the actions that need to be taken to address the issues.

The Council publishes regular monitoring reports to identify progress with its planning policies. At the current time, the Council produces annual reports covering:

  • housing land availability
  • housing land supply
  • employment land availability

Housing Land Availability

5 Year Housing Supply

Windfall Analysis 2013

Employment Land Availability

Glossary of Terms

  • The Act – the Planning Compulsory Purchase Act 2004 as amended.
  • Adoption - the final confirmation of a development plan or local development document status by a local planning authority (LPA).
  • Authority Monitoring Report (AMR) - a report on how the Council is performing in terms of the Local Plan. Includes monitoring implementation and performance of policies following changes brought in by the Local Planning Regulations 2012. It replaces the Annual Monitoring Report. Local planning authorities are no longer required to send an Annual Monitoring Report to the Secretary of State and instead monitoring should be a continuous process.
  • Area Action Plan (AAP) - a type of development plan document focused upon a specific location or an area subject to conservation or significant change (for example major regeneration). There are none currently proposed in Stroud District.
  • Circulars - statements of Government policy, often supplying guidance or background information on legislative or procedural matters which may prove to be a material consideration in the determination of a planning application if relevant to the decision.
  • Department of Communities and Local Government (DCLG) – the Department for Communities and Local Government (DCLG) is the UK Government department responsible for planning matters in England . It was established in May 2006 and is the successor to the Office of the Deputy Prime Minister, established in 2001.
  • Development Plan – document setting out the local planning authority's policies and proposals for the development and use of land and buildings in their area. It is the starting point for the determination of planning applications. Local plans and neighbourhood plans form part of the development plan.
  • Development Plan Document (DPD) – a land use plan which has development plan status and is subject to community involvement and independent examination. It forms part of the Local Plan.
  • Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) – A procedure to be followed for certain types of project to ensure that decisions are made in full knowledge of any likely significant effects on the environment.
  • Evidence Base – is the information and data gathered by local authorities to justify the “soundness” of the policy approach, including physical, economic, and social characteristics of an area.
  • Issues and Options - produced relatively early as part of the preparation of Development Plan Documents and used for consultation and community involvement.
  • Local Plan – The plan for the future development of the local area, drawn up by the local planning authority in consultation with the community. In law this is described as the development plan documents adopted under the Planning and Compulsory Purchase Act 2004.
  • Local Planning Authority (LPA) - is the local authority or Council that is empowered by law to exercise statutory town planning functions for a particular area of the United Kingdom .
  • Local Transport Plan (LTP) – is a five-year integrated transport strategy, prepared by local authorities in partnership with the community, seeking funding to help provide local transport projects. The plan sets out the resources predicted for delivery of the targets identified in the strategy.
  • Monitoring – a regular collection and analysis of relevant information in order to assess the outcome and effectiveness of policies and proposals and to identify whether they need to be reviewed or altered. National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF) - this sets out the Government's planning policies for England and how these are expected to be applied. It provides a framework within which local people and councils can produce their own distinctive local and neighbourhood plans, which reflect the needs and priorities of their communities.
  • Neighbourhood Plans - Parish councils can use neighbourhood planning powers to establish general planning policies for the development and use of land in a neighbourhood. Neighbourhood plans form part of the development plan.
  • Policies Map - an obligatory component of a local plan (formerly referred to as a Proposals Map) showing the location of proposals in the plan on an Ordnance Survey base map.
  • Regional Spatial Strategy (RSS) - the Regional Spatial Strategy for the South West has been revoked. However, it was a strategy for how the region should look in the future. Identified the scale and distribution of new housing in the region, indicates areas for regeneration, expansion or sub-regional planning and specifies priorities for the environment, transport, infrastructure, economic development, minerals and waste treatment and disposal.
  • The Regulations – Town and Country Planning (Local Planning) ( England ) Regulations 2012.
  • Saved Policies – are policies that were originally in the 2005 adopted Local Plan but which are still relevant and therefore remain current policy.
  • Soundness - to be considered sound, a Development Plan Document must be positively prepared, justified, effective and consistent with national policy. Spatial Planning - brings together and integrates policies for the development and use of land with other policies and programmes which influence the nature of places and how they function geographically.
  • Spatial Strategy - a ‘spatial' vision and strategy specific to the area.
  • Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) - a generic term used to describe environmental assessment as applied to policies, plans and programmes. The European ‘SEA Directive' (2001/42/EC) requires a formal ‘environmental assessment of certain plans and programmes, including those in the field of planning and land use which have a significant effect on the environment.'
  • Supplementary Planning Document (SPD) - additional advice issued by the local planning authority to explain how policies will be implemented. It is a material consideration when adopted and is subject to community and stakeholder consultation. It must be linked to policies or proposals in the Local Plan but are not part of the development plan.
  • Supplementary Planning Guidance (SPG ) - additional advice issued by the local planning authority to explain how policies will be implemented. Replaced by Supplementary Planning Documents (SPD) following the review of the planning system in 2004.
  • Sustainability Appraisal (SA) - an appraisal of the economic, environmental and social effects of a plan from the outset of the preparation process to allow decisions to be made that accord with sustainable development.
  • Sustainable Development – is development which meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs. The NPPF states sustainable development is about positive growth – making economic, environmental and social progress for this and future generations.